DETAILS

CHALLENGE SUMMARY

Core77, Autodesk and iFixit challenge you or your team to design a smart product that is smarter environmentally; a product that can be repaired and will stand the test of time, even if some of its components need to be replaced. Rethink the design of average household appliances, electronics, lighting, toys—any and all kinds of products that are ripe for a lower-impact redesign.

KEY DATES

  • All submissions due—Thursday, November 15th extended!
  • Winners announced—Wednesday, December 5th

PRIZES (for individuals and teams)

1st Place

2nd Place

  • $1,000 USD
  • Pro Tech Toolkit from iFixit.com—70-piece tool set to fix all the personal electronics in your life

3rd Place

All Winners

  • Your projects covered on the Core77 and Autodesk websites

JURY BIOS

Allan Chochinov Allan Chochinov
Partner and Editor-in-Chief, Core77

Kyle Wiens Kyle Wiens
Co-founder and CEO, iFixit

Dan Lockton Dan Lockton
Researcher and Founder of Design with Intent Toolkit

Jeremy Faludi Jeremy Faludi
Sustainable Design Strategist, Educator and Researcher.


Fred Bould Fred Bould
Design Director | Founder, Bould Design

Dawn Danby Dawn Danby
Senior Sustainable Design Program Manager and co-creator of Autodesk Sustainability Workshop, Autodesk, Inc.

Adam Menter Adam Menter
Sustainability Education Program Manager and co-creator of Autodesk Sustainability Workshop, Autodesk, Inc.

ELIGIBILITY

This challenge is open to individuals or teams of students age 18 and older, from anywhere in the world, currently registered in an educational institution at the college/university level or 2012 graduates.

HELP DESK

Questions? Email us at challenges@core77.com

 
A Core77 Student Challenge: DESIGN FOR (YOUR) PRODUCT LIFETIME Sponsored by Autodesk & iFixit

Develop a compelling new "smart" product that is repairable and designed to last and you could win up to $2,500 USD in prizes!

Entries are closed.

Posted by core jr  |   5 Dec 2012  |  Comments (0)

Congratulations to the winners of the Design for (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge presented by Autodesk!

Building on Autodesk's improving product lifetime resources on the Sustainability Workshop, in this challenge Core77, Autodesk and iFixit asked students to design a smart product that is smarter environmentally; a product that can be repaired and will stand the test of time, even if some of its components need to be replaced. Sustainability and repairability are important considerations for designers at all career levels. But, by the record number of entries for this challenge, it's apparent that these issues are paramount with young designers as they face the future with increasing needs and decreasing natural resources. Out of the more than 200 entries, judges selected a terrific representation of winners in First, Second and Third place as well as some honorable mentions.

For First Place, judges selected two entries. The Easy Access Computer Monitor designed by Gabriel Nicasio, Praneeth Pulusani and John Zakrzewski from Rochester Institute of Technology and a Repairable Microwave designed by Marshall Jamshidi from Savannah College of Art and Design.

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"The Easy Access Computer Monitor offers a cost benefit to users as well as an environmental benefit in terms of reducing the number of whole monitors which are thrown away rather than repaired," said Dan Lockton, design researcher and creator of the Design with Intent Toolkit and a challenge judge. " In increasing users' confidence in repairing their own products, it could also have further benefits as time goes on. I can also imagine that in many workplace IT contexts, being able to replace backlights easily would have cost benefits."

Commenting on the Repairable Microwave, judge, Kyle Wiens, Co-Founder and CEO of ifixit remarked, "This idea makes me say 'This is so obvious, why has no one done this?' That's the hallmark of a good design. They combined it with a technical innovation that could dramatically increase safety of repair and increase reliability. That's what great designers do—solve lifecycle problems in intuitive ways that make people's lives better."

DFYPL_Microwave_468.jpgClick for full-sized image!

Second Place went to Rocio Garcia Ramos and Bernat Lozano Rabella from Elisava Escola Superior de Disseny de Barcelona for a Smarter Phone with removable parts, a customizable interior and endless exterior combinations that play with colors for housing, buttons and structure. Judges were impressed with the compelling concept and attention to lifecycle as well as the elegant unfolding structure.

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And, with a solid concept, using simple materials, and considering durability, ease of use and emotional connection, David Ngene from Rhode Island School of Design took home Third Place for his Able Modular Headphones.

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Honorable Mentions (Click for Full-Sized Images after the jump):

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Posted by core jr  |   8 Nov 2012  |  Comments (0)

Just a reminder, there's only ONE WEEK LEFT to get your entries in for the Design For (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge. Win up to $2000 and a Pro Tech Toolkit from iFixit.com by designing a smart product that is smarter environmentally; a product that can be repaired and will stand the test of time, even if some of its components need to be replaced. Rethink the design of average household appliances, electronics, lighting, toys—any and all kinds of products that are ripe for a lower-impact redesign.

For some extra help and inspiration, visit the Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop, a free online resource that teaches basic sustainable engineering and design concepts. The free videos and tutorials make it easy for students to learn sustainability strategies that can be incorporated into the design process. Participants in this challenge (and all students) can leverage the resources and even use Autodesk software, downloadable for free, including Autodesk® Inventor® Fusion and Autodesk® Inventor® Publisher.

We know you've been working on your projects all semester so here's your time to shine! All entries are due by THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 15th—that's only one week away!

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Posted by core jr  |   2 Nov 2012  |  Comments (0)

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On a recent visit to Croatia, I was struck by how many small Roman archeological sites dotted the landscape as well as how many wells, pumps, bridges and roads built by the armies of rulers like Diocletian still serve the region. I'm guessing that neither the taskmasters nor the slaves who carted the stones and dug the wells would have considered themselves industrial designers, but they were certainly part of a tradition of designing with intent—making sure that precious resources were used and re-used and, above all, designed to last.

Roman_Ruins_-_Solin_-_Outside_Split_-_Croatia_02.jpegRomans ruins of Solin (Salona), outside Split, Croatia. June 2004. Photo by Adam Jones

But what does it mean to design with intent in the 21st century when our natural and human-made resources are more precious than ever before? Designing for your product's lifetime is more than just a perspective on the end product, it's a total concept that can help designers structure the entire design process to more efficiently and effectively source, create, distribute and repair products that withstand the test of time, even if some of the pieces need to be fixed or replaced. To help reach these goals, Dan Lockton's Design with Intent Toolkit focuses on how to design objects for certain kinds of human behavior: for example, how to encourage a user to consume less water or energy. Autodesk also took a closer look at Designing with intent on their Sustainability Workshop blog.

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Core77's Design for (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge is all about designing with intent. In partnership with Autodesk and iFixit, we've asked students and recent graduates to present a new "smart" product that's also smarter environmentally. Coming up on our November 15 deadline for submissions, we're looking forward to seeing a variety of entries we expect would make Diocletian proud.

Entries are due November 15 and winners will be announced on December 5 on Core77 and with a special webcast presented by Autodesk. Prizes include:

1ST PLACE


  • $2,000 AmEx card

  • Pro Tech Base Toolkit, available on iFixit.com, along with the Oak Gerstner Toolbox

2ND PLACE


  • $1,000 AmEx card

  • Pro Tech Base Toolkit, available on iFixit.com

3RD PLACE


  • $750 AmEx card

  • $25 gift certificate to iFixit.com

Good luck to all who have entered! And if you need some extra inspiration, watch this webinar from Dawn Danby, Senior Sustainable Design Program Manager at Autodesk and co-creator of Autodesk Sustainability Workshop, reviews a range of sustainable product development strategies, focusing on ways designers can guide users to more sustainable behavior.

Posted by core jr  |  18 Oct 2012  |  Comments (0)

The deadline for the Design for (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge is one month away!

The challenge, sponsored by Autodesk and iFixit is Core77's second in this series created for students and recent graduates worldwide. Although many of the entries are coming in through class activities, there are plenty of online resources to help you envision and design a new "smart" product that's also smarter environmentally on your own or with a team of friends.

In addition to Autodesk Software (available free for students), check out this video series that outlines and explains sustainable design principles for engineers and architects.


  • With Improving Product Lifetime, you can learn how to decide on the right strategies for optimizing a product's life and end-of-life.

  • Design for Durability explores how you can make your product durable—not only by resisting physical damage and wear, but also by staying relevant

  • Design for Disassembly and Recycling offers tips and tricks for making your designs easy to take apart and recycle

  • Design for Repair and Upgrade will help ensure your products can keep living even if some of their components don't.

There are underlying patterns to how we all interact with our environment and with each other. To get a better sense of how you can incorporate strategies to shape and influence behavior in your project, check out the Design for Intent Toolkit—which was created by Dan Lockton, one of our judges for this second challenge. The Toolkit includes 101 of these strategies and is organized in a series of method cards that can be used to prompt your creativity and inspire you toward success.

And, iFixit's Troubleshooting Forum is also a great place to share ideas, ask questions and think through your project.

Wherever you are in your design process for this challenge, check out these resources for inspiration, education and practical support.

Deadline for entries is November 15, 2012!

Posted by core jr  |  24 Sep 2012  |  Comments (0)

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Last month, we took our show on the road at the IDSA International Conference in Boston. As part of Coroflot's Student Portfolio Review which takes place each year at IDSA, the Design For (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge and the good folks at Autodesk hosted a local beer and lobster roll reception for all attendees.

Educators from leading design schools including SCAD, Art Center College of Design and Carnegie Mellon were on hand (not just for the lobster and beer), but to hear all about the challenge and discuss how it could become part of their fall curricula.

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"As an educator, I think The Design for Your Product Lifetime Student Challenge offers a great opportunity to engage students and ignite their creativity. Core77 and its collaborators have put together a competition that enables students to use the skills and sustainability knowledge they've acquired to design a smart product that is smarter environmentally. Autodesk and iFixit are also providing resources that will enable the entrants to tackle the challenge effectively." said David Weightman, Professor of Industrial Design at the University of Illinois at Urbana Champaign. "It's always good that students have design opportunities that speak to them personally, and the benefits to the winners of publicity and cash won't go amiss either !"

The Design for Your Product Lifetime Student Challenge is up and running at www.core77.com/dfypl. Students and student groups can enter now until November 15.

Check out the site for more information about this challenge or feel free to contact us at challenges@core77.com with specific questions about the program.

Posted by core jr  |  19 Jul 2012  |  Comments (0)

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Core77's Design For (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge is off and running. In its second installment, this challenge, focused on product design for durability and reparability, is the creative vision of many partners including Autodesk, iFixit, Makeshift Magazine and Core77.

Drawing on their knowledge of the principles and practice of sustainable design, Autodesk helped to identify the overall problem and opportunity that this challenge addresses. Design for durability, disassembly and repair are all strategies taught at the Autodesk® Sustainability Workshop, a free online resource that teaches basic sustainable engineering and design concepts. The free videos and tutorials make it easy for students to learn sustainability strategies that can be incorporated into the design process. Participants in this challenge (and all students) can leverage the resources and even use Autodesk software, downloadable for free, including Autodesk® Inventor® Fusion and Autodesk® Inventor® Publisher.

At the heart of this student challenge is the belief that designers can make a huge impact on a product's lifetime, and everyone should have the right to maintain and repair their products. iFixit is all about product maintenance and repair, empowering thousands of people everyday to repair their devices and hardware. As students, the founders Luke and Kyle started iFixit from their college dorm room in 2003. Their mission is the inspiration for this challenge, and their troubleshooting forums provide a huge resource for participants.

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Makeshift Magazine is a quarterly print and online magazine about creativity and ingenuity. Through innovative dispatches from around the world, they document the enterprise of hackers, sharers, innovators and entrepreneurs. To support this challenge, Makeshift drew upon their understanding of the product lifecycle and the impact of electronic waste to create a cool and informative infographic that helps designers understand a clear path to their work.

Core77 works with communities, design associations, schools and individuals to facilitate the ongoing discourse around sustainable design. From featuring articles about sustainable design challenges and solutions, playing a key role in establishing The Designers Accord, sponsoring events such as AIGA SF's Compostmodern, hosting The Designers Accord Sustainability in 7 Video Series and producing the 2008 and 2009 Greener Gadgets Design Competitions, Core77 has long history of pushing the envelope on sustainability advocacy.

Check out all the resources and information from each of these partners in the tools and resources section in the sidebar and remember that the deadline for entries for The Design For (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge has been extended to November 15!

Posted by core jr  |   9 Jul 2012  |  Comments (0)

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When I was a kid, my friend's Dad spent his whole weekend fixing stuff. He'd sit at his workbench and repair old phones, old radios, gadgets and appliances. I never understood why, never saw any value in those old electronics and couldn't imagine why anyone would ever repair old stuff when they could buy cool new stuff.

My friend's Dad wasn't an industrial designer or engineer, but, in his workroom in the garage, he was helping to break the chain of throwaway thinking. Throwaway thinking supports the short-term needs of our culture and industrial systems. But, it doesn't do much for any us in the long-term.

Products like electronics have components that can fail or need to be upgraded, well before the rest of the product needs to be replaced. As a result, we throw away millions of tons of electronics worldwide each year. Disposable, non-repairable electronic products put an enormous strain on ecological systems: they create huge amounts of e-waste and require a constant stream of raw materials and energy.

No matter how easy a product is to repair, however, it's hard to keep it from becoming obsolete as new technologies roll out. Designers can intervene by making it easy for makers, users and recyclers to extend the lifecycle. In addition to overall product lifecycle, consider design strategies such as architecture and form, materials, connections and information, for consumers and end users.

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Building on our successful first invitational challenge last year, Core77 is launching the second Design For (Your) Product Lifetime Student Challenge sponsored by Autodesk and iFixit. For students and recent graduates, this challenge asks designers to present a new "smart" product that's also smarter environmentally: repairable and designed to last, even if some of its components need to be replaced. Examples may include household appliances, electronics, lighting, toys—any and all kinds of products are ripe for a lower-impact redesign.

The challenge launches today and entries are due by Wednesday OCTOBER 10th. Check out the full challenge overview here.

Posted by core jr  |  30 Jun 2012  |  Comments (3)

Background

Through sensors, data and mobile technology, "smart" products provide us with a wealth of intelligence and feedback, changing how we interact with objects, buildings, and each other. More and more products come with some form of electronics, and these are increasingly made hard to repair.

We throw away millions of tons of electronics worldwide each year. This creates not only toxic pollutants in our air and waterways, but also leads to loss in valuable materials. Disposable, non-repairable electronic products put an enormous strain on ecological systems: they create enormous amounts of e-waste and require a constant stream of raw materials and energy.

Repair and recycling is thwarted by design decisions: glued-in batteries, irreplaceable parts, and confusing interfaces. By transforming user interactions, expectations and behavior, designers can change the end-of-life and environmental impacts of the things they design.

Eligibility

This contest is open to students age 18 or older, from anywhere in the world, currently registered in an educational institution at the college/university level. See Rules for full eligibility information.

Submission Requirements

  • Tell the story. One-page storyboard. (This can be a one-page poster/graphic ). Tell a story, describing your user's experience and the problem being solved. What environmental issue are you seeking to address? How does your design solve that?
  • Solution Description. Show off your design with at least 3 product images/renderings. These can be hand drawn or computer generated/rendered with Autodesk software (see Resources) or other design software.
  • Describe the details: 200-300 word written description of solution, including environmental impact improvement (with supplementary details if you have them).
  • Format: All submissions must be in English and packaged as a single PDF document, or zipped folder with PDF documents and CAD files.

Judging Criteria (100 Points possible)

  • Design Concept (50 Points)
    • User benefit—How compelling is the solution? (evaluated with storyboard)
    • Environmental benefit—How much potential is there for improving the environmental impact of the design (specifically end-of-life)?
  • Design Communication (50 Points)
    • How well do your illustrations and/or renderings communicate your concepts? How compelling is the product appearance? (Evaluated with images and design files, if submitted.) Those submissions that include use of Autodesk software will be more favorably judged in this section.

Posted by core jr  |  30 Jun 2012  |  Comments (0)

JURY BIOS

Kyle WiensKyle Wiens
is the co-founder and CEO of iFixit, the largest online repair community and Apple parts retailer. In 2011, he started Dozuki, a software company that is revolutionizing online technical documentation. Kyle is a board member of Softec and the IEEE CE Society. He has spoken widely on cloud computing, technical writing, repair, making service documentation accessible to a global audience, and sustainable consumer electronics device design.

Dan LocktonDan Lockton
is a researcher at WMG, University of Warwick, and at Brunel University in London, specializing in design for behavior change for social and environmental benefit. His Design with Intent toolkit is a resource of design patterns for influencing behavior. At present he's working with CarbonCulture, a London-based startup aiming to reduce workplace energy use through connecting people with energy and behavioral data in engaging ways, alongside freelance consultancy and workshops for industry.

Jeremy FaludiJeremy Faludi
is a sustainable design strategist and researcher. He is a co-author of the Autodesk Sustainability Workshop. He has taught at Stanford University, Minneapolis College of Art and Design, and Emily Carr University of Art and Design. He designed the prototype of AskNature.org for The Biomimicy Institute, and was sustainability research manager for Project FROG, a leader in modular commercial green buildings. He has contributed to five books on sustainable design, including Worldchanging: A User's Guide for the 21st Century.

Fred BouldFred Bould
has taught at Stanford University and California College of Arts and Crafts. His company, Bould Design is a product development studio dedicated to exploring new forms, functions, materials and meanings for products. Bould Design's collaboration with clients such as Nest Labs, Roku, Logitech, Nambe and Pablo has produced a diverse body of work that has been published internationally and honored by several CES Design and Innovation Awards, the ID Magazine Design Review, the GOOD Design Award, Graphics Product Design 3, and the SFMOMA Permanent Design Collection.

Dawn DanbyDawn Danby
has spent 13 years working across disciplines in sustainable design. At Autodesk, Dawn leads the Sustainability Workshop, which provides free, lightweight videos and resources online to teach young engineers, designers, and architects the principles and practice of sustainable design. Dawn co-authored the bestselling sustainability book, Worldchanging: A User's Guide to the 21st Century. She has given dozens of talks around the world, spoke at TEDGlobal in 2005, and was recognized by Fast Company in 2009 as one of the 100 Most Creative People in Business.

Adam Menter
Adam Menter
is the Manager of the Sustainability Education Program at Autodesk. Since 2009, Adam has supported Autodesk's sustainable design program on projects related to education, strategy, and product development. As Manager of the Sustainability Education Program, he builds relationships with students, professors, and professionals who are working to advance the practice of sustainable design. He has worked as a design strategist at Jump Associates and holds both a mechanical engineering degree and an MBA from Vanderbilt University. He is a LEED accredited professional and a leader of the San Francisco Net Impact chapter.

Allan ChochinovAllan Chochinov
is a partner of Core77, a New York-based design network serving a global community of designers and design enthusiasts. He is the editor-in-chief of Core77.com, the widely read design website, Coroflot.com design job and portfolio site, and DesignDirectory.com design firm database. Allan lectures around the world and at professional conferences including IDSA, AIGA and IxDA, has been a guest critic at various design schools in including Yale University, NYU, University of Minnesota, RIT and RMIT. He has moderated and led workshops and symposia at the Aspen Design Conference, the Rockefeller Center at Bellagio, Compost Modern and Winterhouse, and is a frequent design competition juror.

Prior to Core77, his work in product design focused on the medical and diagnostic fields, as well as on consumer products and workplace systems. (Projects included work for Herman Miller, Johnson & Johnson, Federal Express, Kodak, A.C. Nielsen, Oral-B, Crunch Fitness and others.) He has been named on numerous design and utility patents and has received awards from I.D. Magazine, Communication Arts, The Art Directors Club and The One Club. He serves on the boards of the Designers Accord, Design Ignites Change and DesigNYC.

In 2012, Allan launched a new graduate design MFA program in Products of Design at the School of Visual Arts in New York City, focusing on the purposeful, systemic role of artifacts and design offerings in multidisciplinary contexts.

Posted by core jr  |  30 Jun 2012

Sorry, this challenge is closed. Stay tuned for results!

Posted by core jr  |  12 Jan 2012  |  Comments (0)


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The Autodesk Sustainability Workshop is a free and vast online resource that aims to teach sustainability strategies, from micro to macro. The simple, easily-digestible series of strategy videos, tutorials and case studies can help students, educators, designers, engineers and architects not only learn about sustainability, but how to directly apply it.

Core77 asked 5 students to take it for a test spin, investigating the workshop and using Autodesk software to incorporate what they'd learned in a re-design of a commonplace object. In the final installment of our series, we look at Arizona-based John Turner (B.S.D. in Industrial Design, Spring 2012) and his "Hydra."

Core77: John, tell us about yourself.

I was born and raised in Gilbert, Arizona, and am currently finishing up my Industrial Design degree at Arizona State University. I am 22 years old.

What made you decide to study industrial design?

I've always been interested in making things and figuring out how they work. When I was in high school I was introduced to ID as a profession when the Phoenix Art Museum had an introductory hands-on Industrial Design workshop in conjunction with their streamlined car exhibit. I attended and from there it was no turning back.

Where did you decide to study, and why?

Initially I chose to study at Arizona State University for financial reasons and because the professor that taught the workshop at the Phoenix Art Museum teaches at the school. What also attracted me to the program was the school's strong focus on materials, processes, and professional practice. Now in my final year, I am part of ASU's Innovation Space, a multi-disciplinary program that teams me with an engineer, a visual communications designer, and a business major to work through a project sponsored by Dow Corning.

What areas of industrial design are you interested in focusing on?

I like getting into the details and thinking about how all the parts of a system come together. Most of my focus is on consumer products. This summer I interned at Design Packaging, Inc. and got to learn a lot about packaging, which is an avenue I would like to continue to explore.

Tell us about your project, the "Hydra."

At first I was focusing on finding an object around the house that could be designed more efficiently. I was looking at things like toasters, headphones, and irons. Then I was notified that I could rework a previous project that I had done, so I switched over to the outdoor tool set that I designed last year. While I liked the concept, the execution was off. So I saw this as a chance to get the project right.

continued...

Posted by core jr  |  22 Dec 2011  |  Comments (0)

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The Autodesk Sustainability Workshop is a free and vast online resource that aims to teach sustainability strategies, from micro to macro. The simple, easily-digestible series of strategy videos, tutorials and case studies can help students, educators, designers, engineers and architects not only learn about sustainability, but how to directly apply it.

Core77 asked 5 students to take it for a test spin, investigating the workshop and using Autodesk software to incorporate what they'd learned in a re-design of a commonplace object. In the fourth installment of our series we look at San-Francisco-based Marc Levinson (California College of the Arts, B.F.A. in Industrial Design) and his Lili Tea Infuser.

Marc, tell us about yourself.

I'm 23 years old, I was born in West Palm Beach, Florida and I currently live in San Francisco, California.

What made you decide to study industrial design?

Since I was little I've had two seemingly opposing interests in art and business. I really enjoy drawing, inventing and working on entrepreneurial ventures. When I was 16 years old a friend of mine introduced me to Industrial Design and I decided it was the only career for me to pursue.

Where did you decide to study, and why?

I decided to go to California College of the Arts in San Francisco. I was very excited by San Francisco's renowned design community and its proximity to Silicon Valley. I went to CCA during high school for a summer program and was impressed by the faculty, facilities and student work.

What areas of industrial design are you interested in focusing on?

One of my favorite things about Industrial Design is having the opportunity to learn about and design all types of products. I am however particularly interested in the materials and manufacturing processes involved in each project.

Tell us about your project, the Lili Tea Infuser.

It began as a student project. Brewing loose-leaf tea is an age-old custom, but its popularity in the United States has been growing quickly over the past few years. My objective was to design a simple, elegant household object so this seemed like a good choice; the tea infuser, although relatively simple, is unique and leaves room for very elegant, detail-oriented refinement. I also saw this as a good opportunity to learn about tea and the rituals involved in preparing it.

What background do you have with Autodesk products, and how were you first introduced to them?

My dad is an Electrical Engineer and taught me how to use AutoCAD when I was a little kid, so I have known about Autodesk for as long as I can remember. Now I use SketchBook Pro often for product ideations. I've also played with Alias, 3DS Max, Mudbox, Maya and Photofly.

Please describe which Autodesk products you use or used for this project, and what you like or dislike about them.

I used Autodesk Inventor Fusion in order to alter my original design. I then rendered and animated it in Inventor Publisher. Fusion was very easy to transition to from Solidworks. Relative to other rendering software, Publisher made it very easy to make animations and communicate my ideas. On the other hand, I did think the interface in Publisher was a little fussy and hard to control with much accuracy.

What things did you learn from the Sustainability Workshop that you didn't know before?

I was not aware of how big the impact of certain manufacturing processes can be—one little change can make a big difference even if the materials stay the same. I also learned how to better balance cost and sustainability.

Please describe your design process.

At first I was planning on starting back at the end of the concept phase, redesigning the form of my tea infuser from scratch with sustainability as the focus from the beginning. The workshop rightfully explains that this method is ideal, but in the end I decided it would be better to refine my existing form, which had already taken some product lifetime elements into consideration, as well as a significant amount of research and form finding. This being said, there was still lots of room for improvement.

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Posted by core jr  |  17 Nov 2011  |  Comments (1)

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The Autodesk Sustainability Workshop is a free and vast online resource that aims to teach sustainability strategies, from micro to macro. The simple, easily-digestible series of strategy videos, tutorials and case studies can help students, educators, designers, engineers and architects not only learn about sustainability, but how to directly apply it.

Core77 asked 5 students to take it for a test spin, investigating the workshop and using Autodesk software to incorporate what they'd learned in a re-design of a commonplace object. In the third installment of our series of Autodesk Sustainability Workshop projects, we look at 21-year-old David Markus (Savannah College of Art and Design, BFA in Industrial Design, Fall 2012) and his net-zero energy lamp inspired by the "Liter of Light" project.

David, tell us about yourself.

I grew up in Raleigh, North Carolina before moving to Savannah, Georgia for school. I turned 21 this year.

What made you decide to study industrial design?

I grew up in a pretty technical household; my mother was an engineer and my father was a computer programmer. As a child I was fascinated with taking things apart, though putting them back together generally wasn't in the plan. These days, however, I love to build things. I've turned into a bit of a shop geek, and have spent countless hours making contraptions and toys. Since I enjoy making things, Industrial Design gave me the opportunity to combine a lot of my passions and helps me to explore my ideas.

Where did you decide to study, and why?

After visiting Savannah, the decision was easy. SCAD has some incredible facilities, and Savannah is one of the most unique cities I've ever visited. The ID department at SCAD was especially impressive with the amount of digital fabrication equipment students had access to.

What areas of industrial design are you interested in focusing on?

I've always loved digital technology, and see it gaining even more importance in the future. Digital fabrication technology and equipment is becoming more and more affordable and sophisticated and I'm interested to see the way it affects design.

Tell us about your project.

The idea was to utilize sustainable manufacturing practices to create a net-zero energy lamp. This is a concept that I've had in the back of my head for a while, and it was reignited by a recent article showing used soda bottles being filled with water and installed into houses in third-world countries. The bottles captured a significant amount of light, and I wondered if a more industrial and refined version could be designed. Natural light has always seemed superior to any kind of artificial light, and I wanted to create a system for gathering and dispersing the light into a home or building using flexible fiber optic cable.

continued...

Posted by core jr  |   9 Nov 2011  |  Comments (0)

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The Autodesk Sustainability Workshop is a free and vast online resource that aims to teach sustainability strategies, from micro to macro. The simple, easily-digestible series of strategy videos, tutorials and case studies can help students, educators, designers, engineers and architects not only learn about sustainability, but how to directly apply it.

Core77 asked 5 students to take it for a test spin, investigating the workshop and using Autodesk software to incorporate what they'd learned in a re-design of a commonplace object. In the second installment of our series of Autodesk Sustainability Workshop projects, we look at Massachusetts-based David Fustino (Wentworth Institute of Technology, Bachelor's of Industrial Design) and IRIS, his re-design of a desk lamp.

Core77: David, tell us about yourself.

David Fustino: I'm 22 years old, originally from Meriden, Connecticut and currently living in Framingham, Massachusetts.

What made you decide to study industrial design?

I always had a passion for art, particularly drawing and the way things worked. Industrial Design seemed liked the perfect combination.

Where did you decide to study, and why?

I decided to study at Wentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. The Wentworth curriculum requires students to acquire two internships, a semester each, prior to graduation. I knew this was an opportunity to get real-world experience and develop my skills professionally. It broadened my professional network upon graduation and helped me more easily secure an entry-level position.

What areas of industrial design are you interested in focusing on?

I am always open to learning and experiencing different projects and intend on using what I learn in the industry to create a positive impact on the future of design in areas such as energy, transportation, purposeful consumer electronics and essential social needs/necessities.

Tell us about your project, IRIS.

IRIS is a magnetically assembled three-legged desk lamp that structurally displays the LED bulb and elegantly diffuses the light. When I designed this desk lamp at Wentworth, I took many thoughts into consideration such as environmental impact, manufacturing possibilities, alternatives materials, product performance and user interaction.

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My Initial Intent/Design:

LED bulbs are structurally adorned with beautiful heatsinks to dissipate heat and are engineered to last up to 46 years. In such a "throw away society" this LED bulb delivers longevity in a market of rapid obsolescence. If a user will use a single bulb for more than three decades, how can the bulb be cherished? IRIS was structurally designed to display this wonderful balance of design & engineering rather than concealing it within a fixture.

A minimal base rises above clutter to co-exist with surroundings and magnets reduce the need for fasteners & hardware. The conically shaped underside lid evenly redirects and diffuses the light toward the users desktop surface. The lid is easily removable to service the bulb below.

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Posted by core jr  |  27 Oct 2011  |  Comments (1)

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The Autodesk Sustainability Workshop is a free and vast online resource that aims to teach sustainability strategies, from micro to macro. The simple, easily-digestible series of strategy videos, tutorials and case studies can help students, educators, designers, engineers and architects not only learn about sustainability, but how to directly apply it.

Core77 asked 5 students to take it for a test spin, investigating the workshop and using Autodesk software to incorporate what they'd learned in a re-design of a commonplace object. We start with California-based Erin Fong (California College of the Arts, BFA in Industrial Design, May 2011) and her update to the DSLR.

Core77: Erin, tell us about yourself.
Erin Fong: I am 24 and I was born in Oakland, but am currently living in Castro Valley. I love to travel, find new experiences, and read—classic literature, historical fiction and even rereading some favorite childhood books. I also like running, that's when I get a lot of my design thinking done.

What made you decide to study industrial design?
I grew up in a family that encouraged creativity and was exposed to the arts at a very young age. I always loved hands-on projects and received my first glue gun in elementary school. I felt like the glue gun allowed me to create almost anything, and that was my introduction to creating 3D objects. I've carried that interest with me and always feel the urge to make products work better to my own lifestyle.

What areas of industrial design are you interested in focusing on?
My natural tendencies have been toward consumer products and electronics, but I am always open to learning and experiencing different things.

Tell us about your project.
My goal is to challenge the form of the SLR camera. From my experience and from watching other people take pictures, there are so many different ways people position themselves in order to get the perfect picture: Lying on the ground, standing on top of chairs, crouching behind a tree, etc. Depending on the environment and situation, the demands on a photographer are different. However, the form of the camera has always remained the same: a static box. As a result, I wanted to try to create a new form that allowed users to gain a better grip on the camera when they're shooting from any angle. In addition, I wanted to make it friendly for both right and left-handed users because especially when using only one hand to hold the camera, people prefer to use their dominant hand, but when the shutter button is only on one side, some people are forced to use their non-dominant hand, making it more difficult to get the picture they want.

I also wanted to make the flow of taking pictures more seamless. Currently, a lot of the camera buttons are located on the back of the camera, so when making adjustments to the camera settings, sometimes people have to take the camera away from their face and look at the camera. By moving the buttons to the front of the camera handle where it is easily accessible to the fingers, I wanted it to be like a musical instrument—just like how a pianist can create a variety of beautiful music without looking down at the keys, I wanted photographers to have an uninterrupted time focusing on the picture they're taking without have to take their eyes off of the subject to look at the camera buttons.

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From a sustainability viewpoint, DSLR cameras have a pretty good lifetime, but what do you do when it's obsolete? Another idea I'm going after is how to recycle and reuse a good portion of the camera body immediately after the actual camera stops working or becomes replaced by better models. Therefore, the key change I made to the original design was eliminating one of the camera handles, because simply having one handle maintains my original intent of making the camera friendly for both left and right handed users (as well as the single-handed function). Now the single handle breaks into a tripod. As a result, when the camera fails to take pictures, the camera handle/tripod can be removed from the rest of the camera body and be reused, maintaining its function as a tripod for other cameras without having to be collected and going through the recycling process.

I knew the camera project would be a good challenge for me, and I wanted to prompt an interesting way of thinking about sustainability.

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